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1 Introduction

Among the most impressive features in the large-scale structure of the universe are huge areas void of galaxies that reach sizes of 100 Mpc. Besides these huge "empty'' regions which are revealed in deep galaxy redshift surveys (e.g. Joeever et al. 1978; Kirshner et al. 1984; de Lapparent et al. 1986) there are also "empty'' regions with diameters of 3 to 5 Mpc ("minivoids'', Karachentsev 1994) in the nearby universe. Tully (1988) noted a wide region of sky toward $\rm RA \sim 19h$, and $\rm Dec. \sim +20^{0}$ which was free of cataloged galaxies. This Local Void is centered to $\rm RA = 18h~38m$, $\rm Dec.=+18^{0}$ and having a radius of 300 (Karachentseva et al. 1999).

In this paper we present results of a 21-cm line search for candidate dwarf galaxies out to $v_{\rm hel}$ = 3970 km s-1 in a 6000 square degree area centered to RA [14h, 23h30], $\rm Dec.=[-20^{0},~+60^{0}]$including the Local Void, taken from a list of Karachentseva et al. (1999). Ideas of biased galaxy formation (Dekel & Silk 1986) would expect dwarf galaxies to be less concentrated compared to the distribution of more massive galaxies.


  \begin{figure}
\par\includegraphics[]{1917f1a.eps}\end{figure} Figure 1: H I profiles observed with the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg which has a HPBW of 9 $.\mkern -4mu^\prime $3. The flux scale is in Jy, the heliocentric radial velocity (optical convention) in kms-1. Observations were obtained in the total power mode [ON-OFF] which yields a residual of the Local H I emission around 0 kms-1. The profiles are arranged in ascending RA starting at the bottom left corner


 \begin{figure}
\par\includegraphics[]{1917f1b.eps}
\end{figure} Figure 1: continued

The Local Void is an ideal field for this kind of search as it is very close and only here, at such small distances we do have the sensitivity to find tiny dwarf galaxies at all, both optically and in the 21-cm line of neutral hydrogen.


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